Thermo-Tech Premium Windows and Doors
  • Resources

    Resources

    Knowledgeable industry experts.

With Thermo-Tech Premium Windows and Doors, you’re always working with a knowledgeable team that’s ready to answer your questions. Simply contact us, we’re here to help with selection recommendations, questions, installation instructions and trouble-shooting. We loaded this section of the website with brochures and other support materials for easy click-to reference.

We highly recommend that homeowners arrange for professional installation to make sure that your window or door investment fits and functions the way you imagined. Your dealer should be able to recommend installers in your area.

Of course, even the most experienced contractors can’t always know what’s behind every replacement project. Talk to the professionals at Thermo-Tech when you run into those unexpected situations or odd measurements. You’ll get all the support you need, from start to finish.

Parts & Service Request

Our knowledgeable staff is ready to help!

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Parts Directory

Our online directory for Thermo-Tech parts.

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  • Care & Maintenance

    Congratulations on choosing windows and doors that offer the easy care and maintenance of vinyl. Vinyl won’t pit or peel. With only simple cleaning, your windows can keep their beautiful appearance for years to come.

    Like any surface exposed to outside elements, your windows or doors will get dirty from time to time. Often heavy rains will wash the vinyl clean. If the rain isn’t enough, you can restore the splendor of the windows or doors by following these simple instructions.

    Cleaning the Frame


    Wash using mild detergent (if necessary) and a soft cloth or an ordinary long-handled, soft-bristle brush. Do not wash the window or doors with a high-pressure spray. The extreme pressure could crack or destroy the caulking around the window or door.

    To remove difficult dirt and stains, use the readily available household cleaners listed on the chart. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on use of the cleaners. In some cases, you may wish to use a mildly abrasive cleaner such as Soft Scrub®, but the use of any abrasive material could scratch or dull the surface of the glass and window or door frame. Always test cleaners in an inconspicuous area first.

    Do not use liquid grease remover, strong soaps and detergents containing organic solvents, nail polish remover, furniture polish or cleaners containing chlorine bleach. These items could affect the surface appearance of the vinyl.

    Cleaners to Remove Stains from Vinyl Window and Door Frames

    Cleaning materials are listed in alphabetical order

    Bubble Gum
    Fantastik®, Murphy Oil Soap®, solution of 30% vinegar and 70% water, Windex®
    Crayon
    Lestoil®
    Felt-tip Pen
    Fantastik®, water-based cleaners
    Grass
    Fantastik®, Lysol®, Murphy Oil Soap®, Windex®
    Lipstick
    Fantastik®, Lysol®, Murphy Oil Soap®
    Lithium Grease
    Fantastik®, Lestoil®, Murphy Oil Soap®, Windex®
    Mold and Mildew
    Fantastik®, solution of 30% vinegar and 70% water, Windex®
    Motor Oil
    Fantastik®, Lysol®, Murphy Oil Soap®, Windex®
    Oil
    Soft Scrub® (may dull surface finish)
    Paint
    Brillo® Pad (use with water, may scratch surface finish)
    Pencil
    Soft Scrub® (may dull surface finish)
    Rust
    Fantastik®, Murphy Oil Soap®
    Tar
    Soft Scrub® (may dull surface finish)
    Top Soil
    Fantastik®, Lestoil®, Murphy Oil Soap®

    Cleaning the Glass and Screens


    Use only mild soap, water, and a soft brush when cleaning your screens. When finished, rinse with clear water and wipe dry. Use a glass cleaner or mild detergent to clean the glass. Do not use a high-pressure spray, petroleum-based cleaners or caustic cleaners.

    Check Your Windows and Door Drainage


    Thermo-Tech windows and doors are designed with a drainage system to protect the inside of your home. Proper maintenance of the drainage system ensures it will continue to function as it should.

    Periodically inspect the drainage holes to make certain they are clear of any dirt or debris. Use a soft bottlebrush to clear openings.

    Occasionally vacuum the tracks on sliding doors and windows to clear any dirt or debris.

    Operation of Your Vinyl Windows and Doors


    Along with being virtually maintenance free, your window and doors have been designed and manufactured to be thermally efficient, aesthetically pleasing and easy to operate. For easy access during cleaning, all Double-Hung and Single-Hung Windows with operable sashes tilt in. Slider Window sashes lift out. Casement Window sashes open by turning the handle.

    To tilt in the operable sash on Double-Hung and Single-Hung Windows, simply unlock the sash and raise (or lower) it approximately 2″ above (or below) the frame. Slide the tilt latches toward the cam lock and gently tilt the sash in. Always support tilted sash while cleaning. When finished cleaning, tilt the sash up and snap the tilt latches into place. For safety, make sure the tilt latches are securely engaged.

    If it becomes necessary to remove and reinsert the sash, tilt the sash inward to a 90-degree angle and lift the bottom of the sash up and out of the frame. To reinsert the sash into the frame, make sure both pivot bars (located at the bottom of the sash) are fully inserted into the balance shoes.

    To remove a Slider Window sash, simply unlock the sash and slide it past the sash retainer insert located in the head. Lift the sash up into the head and pull the bottom of the sash toward you.

    To operate a Casement Window, lift the handle on the side of the frame to unlock the sash. Turn the handle on the bottom of the frame to open the sash to the desired position. Turn the handle in the opposite direction to close the sash. To lock the window, make sure the sash is fully closed. Then lower the handle on the side of the frame.

     

  • Product Literature

    Read all about the quality windows and doors from Thermo-Tech Premium Windows and Doors. Want to talk to a pro? Please visit or call your local dealer to learn more about Thermo-Tech’s impressive selection of windows and doors. Call 1-877-565-0159 or locate a dealer nearest you.

  • Frequently Asked Questions

    Q.Who is Thermo-Tech?
    A.Thermo-Tech is a premium window and door company that develops advanced technologies and superior vinyl products that compete favorably with anything you see on the market today. We’ve staked our company’s reputation on helping homeowners realize their dreams. Personal attention and genuine commitment show in every product we make. It’s not about shouting our name…it’s about your satisfaction.
    Q.
    Why does Thermo-Tech manufacture vinyl windows and doors? 
    A.Thermo-Tech specializes in advanced PVC fenestration applications—a fancy way of saying that we make smart vinyl windows and doors. Period. No warpable wood. No overpriced composites. We believe our focus on vinyl ensures that our windows and doors deliver the value today’s homeowners expect.
    Q.
    Are vinyl-clad windows the same as Thermo-Tech Vinyl Windows & Doors?
    A.No, not even close. Cladding is simply a layer of vinyl or aluminum that covers the primary construction material, such as wood.
    Q.
    Do windows have expiration dates?
    A.Wouldn’t that be nice? Generally, windows older than 25 years probably need replacing to gain greater energy efficiency and savings. Ice or thick frost during the winter, foggy condensation inside the panes, sealed or unopenning frames, or strong drafts all mean it’s time for new Thermo-Tech windows.
    Q.
    Why do windows need weather stripping?
    A.The weather stripping keeps out the elements, like cold wind and rain, while allowing the window mechanism to function smoothly. Thermo-Tech Premium Windows and Doors feature dust-defying weather stripping (that’s a real plus!) everywhere the sash and frame touch.
  • Installation Instructions

    The proper installation of your window is critical to its performance. We recommend contacting a professional Thermo-Tech dealer to assist you with installation. After all, a good fit adds to the performance of your windows. However, if you are handling the project on your own or even helping a professional with the installation of your Thermo-Tech Premium Window and Door products, download our easy-to-follow instructions here.

    Window Installation Instructions


    Patio Door Installation Instructions


    The following information outlines preparing and measuring for a typlical custom Thermo-Fit replacement window project. Please note that there may be some instructions that are unique to a specific window style or your specific project. Please consult your dealer for installation assistance.

    Before You Start


    Inspect the old window. Double check the existing window opening prior to ordering a Thermo-Fit Replacement product.

    Is the frame in good shape? Check the frame around the existing window for signs of damage or rot. Any damaged or rotten window components must be replaced prior to installation of a new window.

    Is the opening square? Measure diagonally from corner to corner. If the diagonal lengths are off by more than 1/4″, the new window should be sized slightly smaller so that it can be installed plumb, level and square.

    Is the opening deep enough? All Thermo-Fit series windows have a frame width of 3-1/4″. The opening must be at least 3-1/4″ from back side of blind stop to back side of interior finish stop. If the opening is less than 3-1/4″, you may need to alter the interior stop or do a full-frame replacement.

    If all of these requirements are met, you can now order your insert window. If these conditions are not met, you may have to order a full frame replacement. Full-frame replacement is when the entire existing window is removed from the wall, which generally means patching the exterior siding and finishing with new interior trim.

    Tools Needed:

    • Silicon Caulk
    • Caulking Gun
    • Hammer
    • Pry Bar
    • Tape Measure
    • Level
    • Square
    • Drill Bits
    • Screw Gun
    • Hack Saw
    • Fiberglass or non-expanding foam insulation

    Measuring Your Existing Window Frame


    Step 1. From inside your home,  measure the width of the existing window frame. Measure between the jambs at three spots: top, middle and bottom.

    Step 2. Now measure the height of the existing window frame. Measure from the head jamb to the sill at the sill’s highest point, normally right behind the stool. Again, measuring in three spots: right, middle and left side.

    Measuring for a Full-Frame Window


    When measuring for a full-frame window unit, you are trying to determine the rough opening. The rough opening is the unfinished wall or opening where a window or door will be installed. It is surrounded by studs on either side, a header on top and a rough sill at the bottom. It is the framing to which the window will mount.

    Step 1. Remove the inside trim to bring studs, header and rough sill into view.

    Step 2. Measure the width of the opening from stud to stud and record the measurement.

    Step 3. Measure the height from the bottom of the header to the top of the rough sill and record the measurement.

    Step 4. Measure the depth of the opening and determine the wall depth. Record the measurement.

    Step 5. Repeat for each window and bring the rough opening measurements into your nearest Thermo-Tech Premium Windows and Doors dealer. Your dealer can show you the options available and determine the correct window size.

    Please note that there may be some instructions that are unique to a specific window style or your specific project. Please consult your dealer for installation assistance.

     

  • Glossary


    Air Chambers
    Small spaces within the sash and frame that help to insulate and strengthen the window.
    Air Infiltration
    The amount of air that passes between a window sash and frame. In windows it is measured in terms of cubic feet or air per minute, per square foot of area. The lower the number, the less air the window lets pass through.
    Argon Gas
    An odorless, colorless, tasteless, non-toxic gas, which is six times more dense than air. It is used to replace air between the glass panes to reduce temperature transfer.
    Awning Window
    A top-hinged window that swings outward for ventilation.

    Bay Window
    An angled combination of three windows that project out from the wall of the home. The windows are commonly joined at 30- or 45-degree angles.
    Bow Window
    An angled combination of windows in 4-, 5- or 6-lite configurations. The windows are attached at 10-degree angles to project a more circular, arced appearance.
    Butyl
    A rubber material that seals the glass to the spacer, creating an airtight and watertight I.G. Unit. Butyl has the lowest gas permeability of all rubbers.

    Cam Lock and Keeper
    The mechanisms that pull the sash together when placed in the locked position.
    Casement Window
    A window with a side-hinged sash that opens outward for ventilation.
    Center of Glass U- and R-values
    The U- and R-values measured from the center of the glass to 2-1/2″ from the frame.
    Conduction
    Energy transfer from one material to another by direct contact.
    Convection
    Heat transfer by currents that flow from a warm surface to a colder one.

    Dead-air space
    The space between the panes of glass of an I.G. Unit.
    Desiccant
    A material used in insulating glass to absorb water vapor that causes fogging.
    Double Hung Window
    A window that has two operable sashes that slide vertically.
    Double-Strength Glass
    Glass with a thickness of approximately 1/8″.

    Egress Code
    The construction code that requires a minimum opening of a window for persons to exit or firefighters to enter a building.
    ENERGY STAR®
    ENERGY STAR® is an independent U.S. government program establishing a standard set of guidelines to recognize the energy efficiency of various products. ENERGY STAR® guidelines are used in conjunction with a variety of building materials, including windows and patio doors. Over the past ten years, ENERGY STAR® guidelines have helped double the efficiency of windows they endorse.

    Fenestration
    The design and placement of openings in a building, including windows and doors.
    Fenestration Product
    Any transparent or translucent glazing material plus any associated sash, framer mullions and/or dividers, in the envelope of a building, including, but not limited to windows, sliding glass doors, French doors, skylights, curtain walls and garden windows.
    Fusion-welded
    The process of joining materials by melting them together with extreme heat (over 500ºF), resulting in the materials uniting into a one-piece unit.

    Geometric
    Specially designed windows classified as either Straight-line Geometrics, such as rectangles, triangles, trapezoids, octagons, pentagons, etc., or Radius Geometrics, which include half-rounds, quarter-rounds, full-rounds, sectors, ellipses, eyebrows, etc.
    Glass
    An inorganic transparent material composed of sand (silica), soda (sodium bicarbonate), and lime (calcium carbonate) with small quantities of alumina, boric or magnesia oxides.
    Glazing
    The process of sealing the glass to the sash.
    Grids
    Decorative horizontal or vertical bars installed between the glass panes to create the appearance of the sash being dividing into smaller areas of glass.

    Head
    The horizontal top portion of the main frame.

    Laminated Glass
    Two or more pieces of glass bonded together over a plastic interlayer.
    Lift Rail
    A handhold for raising and lowering the sash. Rail implies that the handhold is continuous across the sash.
    Lock Stile
    The vertical section of the sash where the cam lock is attached.
    Low E (Emissivity) Glass
    Glass with a transparent metallic oxide coating applied onto or into a glass surface. The coating allows short-wave energy to pass through, but reflects long-wave infrared energy to improve the U-value.

    Main Frame
    The head, sill and jamb sections of a window.
    Mechanically Fastened Frame
    Refers to frames fastened with screws.
    Meeting Rail
    The horizontal sections of a pair of sash that meet when the sash are closed.
    Meeting Stile
    The vertical section of a pair of sash that meet when the sash are closed.
    Mesh
    Fabric of either fiberglass or aluminum that is used to make screens.
    Mullion
    A vertical or horizontal connecting unit between two or more windows.

    Nailing Fin
    An extrusion attached to the main frame of a window, which is used to secure the unit to the rough opening.

    Oriel
    A window with the meeting rail located off-center of the frame.

    Patio Door
    A glass door that slides open and closed on adjustable tandem rollers.

    R-value
    Resistance that a material has to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the greater the resistance.
    Radiation
    Wave energy transmitted directly from one object to another through the atmosphere or through transparent or translucent materials. The energy radiated is either transmitted, absorbed, reflected or a combination of all three.
    Rail
    The horizontal sections of the sash.
    Relative Humidity Condensation Point
    The relative humidity level at which visible water vapor or other liquid vapor begins to form on the surface of the sash or frame, based on an inside temperature of 70°F and an outside temperature of 0°F. The higher the percentage, the more moisture the air can hold before condensation will occur.

    Sill
    The horizontal, bottom section of the main frame.
    Sill Extender
    An extrusion that is attached to the bottom of the window to cover the gap between the sill and the rough opening.
    Single Hung
    A window in which one sash slides vertically and the other sash is fixed.
    Single-strength Glass
    Glass with a thickness of approximately 3/32″.
    Slider Window
    A window in which the sash moves horizontally. Sliders are available in a 2- or 3-lite configuration, with the 3-lite having operable end vents.
    Sloped Sill
    The sill of the window that has a downward slope to the outside. This sill has sufficient degree of slope to aid in water runoff.
    Solar Heat Gain
    The percentage of heat gained from both direct sunlight and absorbed heat. The smaller the number, the greater the ability to reduce solar heat gain.
    Spacer
    Material placed between two or more pieces of glass to maintain a uniform width between the glass, and to prevent sealant distortion.
    Stile
    The vertical sections of the sash.

    Tape Glazing
    Two-sided tape used to secure and seal the glass to the sash.
    Tempered Glass
    Glass with a surface compression of not less than 10,000 psi, or an edge compression of not less than 9,700 psi. When broken, the glass breaks into pebbles instead of shards.
    Tilt Latch
    The mechanism that unlocks the sash and allows it to tilt in from the main frame.

    U-value
    Amount of heat transferred through a material. The lower the U-value, the slower the rate of heat flow and the better the insulating quality.
    UV Block
    The percent of ultraviolet rays blocked from being transmitted through the glass. The higher the number, the lower the percentage of ultraviolet rays transmitted through the window.

    Visible Light Transmittance
    The percentage of light that is transmitted through glass in the visible light spectrum (380 to 720 nanometers). The higher the number, the higher the percentage of visible light transmitted through the window.

    Weep Flaps
    A weep hole that is covered with a flap that allows water to escape, while keeping insects out.
    Weep Holes
    Small openings designed to allow water to escape that might otherwise accumulate in a window’s sill.
    Wet Glazing
    A silicone-based substance used to secure and seal the glass to the sash.

     

Care & Maintenance

Care & Maintenance

Congratulations on choosing windows and doors that offer the easy care and maintenance of vinyl. Vinyl won’t pit or peel. With only simple cleaning, your windows can keep their beautiful appearance for years to come.

Like any surface exposed to outside elements, your windows or doors will get dirty from time to time. Often heavy rains will wash the vinyl clean. If the rain isn’t enough, you can restore the splendor of the windows or doors by following these simple instructions.

Cleaning the Frame


Wash using mild detergent (if necessary) and a soft cloth or an ordinary long-handled, soft-bristle brush. Do not wash the window or doors with a high-pressure spray. The extreme pressure could crack or destroy the caulking around the window or door.

To remove difficult dirt and stains, use the readily available household cleaners listed on the chart. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on use of the cleaners. In some cases, you may wish to use a mildly abrasive cleaner such as Soft Scrub®, but the use of any abrasive material could scratch or dull the surface of the glass and window or door frame. Always test cleaners in an inconspicuous area first.

Do not use liquid grease remover, strong soaps and detergents containing organic solvents, nail polish remover, furniture polish or cleaners containing chlorine bleach. These items could affect the surface appearance of the vinyl.

Cleaners to Remove Stains from Vinyl Window and Door Frames

Cleaning materials are listed in alphabetical order

Bubble Gum
Fantastik®, Murphy Oil Soap®, solution of 30% vinegar and 70% water, Windex®
Crayon
Lestoil®
Felt-tip Pen
Fantastik®, water-based cleaners
Grass
Fantastik®, Lysol®, Murphy Oil Soap®, Windex®
Lipstick
Fantastik®, Lysol®, Murphy Oil Soap®
Lithium Grease
Fantastik®, Lestoil®, Murphy Oil Soap®, Windex®
Mold and Mildew
Fantastik®, solution of 30% vinegar and 70% water, Windex®
Motor Oil
Fantastik®, Lysol®, Murphy Oil Soap®, Windex®
Oil
Soft Scrub® (may dull surface finish)
Paint
Brillo® Pad (use with water, may scratch surface finish)
Pencil
Soft Scrub® (may dull surface finish)
Rust
Fantastik®, Murphy Oil Soap®
Tar
Soft Scrub® (may dull surface finish)
Top Soil
Fantastik®, Lestoil®, Murphy Oil Soap®

Cleaning the Glass and Screens


Use only mild soap, water, and a soft brush when cleaning your screens. When finished, rinse with clear water and wipe dry. Use a glass cleaner or mild detergent to clean the glass. Do not use a high-pressure spray, petroleum-based cleaners or caustic cleaners.

Check Your Windows and Door Drainage


Thermo-Tech windows and doors are designed with a drainage system to protect the inside of your home. Proper maintenance of the drainage system ensures it will continue to function as it should.

Periodically inspect the drainage holes to make certain they are clear of any dirt or debris. Use a soft bottlebrush to clear openings.

Occasionally vacuum the tracks on sliding doors and windows to clear any dirt or debris.

Operation of Your Vinyl Windows and Doors


Along with being virtually maintenance free, your window and doors have been designed and manufactured to be thermally efficient, aesthetically pleasing and easy to operate. For easy access during cleaning, all Double-Hung and Single-Hung Windows with operable sashes tilt in. Slider Window sashes lift out. Casement Window sashes open by turning the handle.

To tilt in the operable sash on Double-Hung and Single-Hung Windows, simply unlock the sash and raise (or lower) it approximately 2″ above (or below) the frame. Slide the tilt latches toward the cam lock and gently tilt the sash in. Always support tilted sash while cleaning. When finished cleaning, tilt the sash up and snap the tilt latches into place. For safety, make sure the tilt latches are securely engaged.

If it becomes necessary to remove and reinsert the sash, tilt the sash inward to a 90-degree angle and lift the bottom of the sash up and out of the frame. To reinsert the sash into the frame, make sure both pivot bars (located at the bottom of the sash) are fully inserted into the balance shoes.

To remove a Slider Window sash, simply unlock the sash and slide it past the sash retainer insert located in the head. Lift the sash up into the head and pull the bottom of the sash toward you.

To operate a Casement Window, lift the handle on the side of the frame to unlock the sash. Turn the handle on the bottom of the frame to open the sash to the desired position. Turn the handle in the opposite direction to close the sash. To lock the window, make sure the sash is fully closed. Then lower the handle on the side of the frame.

 

Product Literature

Product Literature

Read all about the quality windows and doors from Thermo-Tech Premium Windows and Doors. Want to talk to a pro? Please visit or call your local dealer to learn more about Thermo-Tech’s impressive selection of windows and doors. Call 1-877-565-0159 or locate a dealer nearest you.

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Q.Who is Thermo-Tech?
A.Thermo-Tech is a premium window and door company that develops advanced technologies and superior vinyl products that compete favorably with anything you see on the market today. We’ve staked our company’s reputation on helping homeowners realize their dreams. Personal attention and genuine commitment show in every product we make. It’s not about shouting our name…it’s about your satisfaction.
Q.
Why does Thermo-Tech manufacture vinyl windows and doors? 
A.Thermo-Tech specializes in advanced PVC fenestration applications—a fancy way of saying that we make smart vinyl windows and doors. Period. No warpable wood. No overpriced composites. We believe our focus on vinyl ensures that our windows and doors deliver the value today’s homeowners expect.
Q.
Are vinyl-clad windows the same as Thermo-Tech Vinyl Windows & Doors?
A.No, not even close. Cladding is simply a layer of vinyl or aluminum that covers the primary construction material, such as wood.
Q.
Do windows have expiration dates?
A.Wouldn’t that be nice? Generally, windows older than 25 years probably need replacing to gain greater energy efficiency and savings. Ice or thick frost during the winter, foggy condensation inside the panes, sealed or unopenning frames, or strong drafts all mean it’s time for new Thermo-Tech windows.
Q.
Why do windows need weather stripping?
A.The weather stripping keeps out the elements, like cold wind and rain, while allowing the window mechanism to function smoothly. Thermo-Tech Premium Windows and Doors feature dust-defying weather stripping (that’s a real plus!) everywhere the sash and frame touch.

Installation Instructions

Installation Instructions

The proper installation of your window is critical to its performance. We recommend contacting a professional Thermo-Tech dealer to assist you with installation. After all, a good fit adds to the performance of your windows. However, if you are handling the project on your own or even helping a professional with the installation of your Thermo-Tech Premium Window and Door products, download our easy-to-follow instructions here.

Window Installation Instructions


Patio Door Installation Instructions


The following information outlines preparing and measuring for a typlical custom Thermo-Fit replacement window project. Please note that there may be some instructions that are unique to a specific window style or your specific project. Please consult your dealer for installation assistance.

Before You Start


Inspect the old window. Double check the existing window opening prior to ordering a Thermo-Fit Replacement product.

Is the frame in good shape? Check the frame around the existing window for signs of damage or rot. Any damaged or rotten window components must be replaced prior to installation of a new window.

Is the opening square? Measure diagonally from corner to corner. If the diagonal lengths are off by more than 1/4″, the new window should be sized slightly smaller so that it can be installed plumb, level and square.

Is the opening deep enough? All Thermo-Fit series windows have a frame width of 3-1/4″. The opening must be at least 3-1/4″ from back side of blind stop to back side of interior finish stop. If the opening is less than 3-1/4″, you may need to alter the interior stop or do a full-frame replacement.

If all of these requirements are met, you can now order your insert window. If these conditions are not met, you may have to order a full frame replacement. Full-frame replacement is when the entire existing window is removed from the wall, which generally means patching the exterior siding and finishing with new interior trim.

Tools Needed:

  • Silicon Caulk
  • Caulking Gun
  • Hammer
  • Pry Bar
  • Tape Measure
  • Level
  • Square
  • Drill Bits
  • Screw Gun
  • Hack Saw
  • Fiberglass or non-expanding foam insulation

Measuring Your Existing Window Frame


Step 1. From inside your home,  measure the width of the existing window frame. Measure between the jambs at three spots: top, middle and bottom.

Step 2. Now measure the height of the existing window frame. Measure from the head jamb to the sill at the sill’s highest point, normally right behind the stool. Again, measuring in three spots: right, middle and left side.

Measuring for a Full-Frame Window


When measuring for a full-frame window unit, you are trying to determine the rough opening. The rough opening is the unfinished wall or opening where a window or door will be installed. It is surrounded by studs on either side, a header on top and a rough sill at the bottom. It is the framing to which the window will mount.

Step 1. Remove the inside trim to bring studs, header and rough sill into view.

Step 2. Measure the width of the opening from stud to stud and record the measurement.

Step 3. Measure the height from the bottom of the header to the top of the rough sill and record the measurement.

Step 4. Measure the depth of the opening and determine the wall depth. Record the measurement.

Step 5. Repeat for each window and bring the rough opening measurements into your nearest Thermo-Tech Premium Windows and Doors dealer. Your dealer can show you the options available and determine the correct window size.

Please note that there may be some instructions that are unique to a specific window style or your specific project. Please consult your dealer for installation assistance.

 

Warranty Information

Glossary

Glossary


Air Chambers
Small spaces within the sash and frame that help to insulate and strengthen the window.
Air Infiltration
The amount of air that passes between a window sash and frame. In windows it is measured in terms of cubic feet or air per minute, per square foot of area. The lower the number, the less air the window lets pass through.
Argon Gas
An odorless, colorless, tasteless, non-toxic gas, which is six times more dense than air. It is used to replace air between the glass panes to reduce temperature transfer.
Awning Window
A top-hinged window that swings outward for ventilation.

Bay Window
An angled combination of three windows that project out from the wall of the home. The windows are commonly joined at 30- or 45-degree angles.
Bow Window
An angled combination of windows in 4-, 5- or 6-lite configurations. The windows are attached at 10-degree angles to project a more circular, arced appearance.
Butyl
A rubber material that seals the glass to the spacer, creating an airtight and watertight I.G. Unit. Butyl has the lowest gas permeability of all rubbers.

Cam Lock and Keeper
The mechanisms that pull the sash together when placed in the locked position.
Casement Window
A window with a side-hinged sash that opens outward for ventilation.
Center of Glass U- and R-values
The U- and R-values measured from the center of the glass to 2-1/2″ from the frame.
Conduction
Energy transfer from one material to another by direct contact.
Convection
Heat transfer by currents that flow from a warm surface to a colder one.

Dead-air space
The space between the panes of glass of an I.G. Unit.
Desiccant
A material used in insulating glass to absorb water vapor that causes fogging.
Double Hung Window
A window that has two operable sashes that slide vertically.
Double-Strength Glass
Glass with a thickness of approximately 1/8″.

Egress Code
The construction code that requires a minimum opening of a window for persons to exit or firefighters to enter a building.
ENERGY STAR®
ENERGY STAR® is an independent U.S. government program establishing a standard set of guidelines to recognize the energy efficiency of various products. ENERGY STAR® guidelines are used in conjunction with a variety of building materials, including windows and patio doors. Over the past ten years, ENERGY STAR® guidelines have helped double the efficiency of windows they endorse.

Fenestration
The design and placement of openings in a building, including windows and doors.
Fenestration Product
Any transparent or translucent glazing material plus any associated sash, framer mullions and/or dividers, in the envelope of a building, including, but not limited to windows, sliding glass doors, French doors, skylights, curtain walls and garden windows.
Fusion-welded
The process of joining materials by melting them together with extreme heat (over 500ºF), resulting in the materials uniting into a one-piece unit.

Geometric
Specially designed windows classified as either Straight-line Geometrics, such as rectangles, triangles, trapezoids, octagons, pentagons, etc., or Radius Geometrics, which include half-rounds, quarter-rounds, full-rounds, sectors, ellipses, eyebrows, etc.
Glass
An inorganic transparent material composed of sand (silica), soda (sodium bicarbonate), and lime (calcium carbonate) with small quantities of alumina, boric or magnesia oxides.
Glazing
The process of sealing the glass to the sash.
Grids
Decorative horizontal or vertical bars installed between the glass panes to create the appearance of the sash being dividing into smaller areas of glass.

Head
The horizontal top portion of the main frame.

Laminated Glass
Two or more pieces of glass bonded together over a plastic interlayer.
Lift Rail
A handhold for raising and lowering the sash. Rail implies that the handhold is continuous across the sash.
Lock Stile
The vertical section of the sash where the cam lock is attached.
Low E (Emissivity) Glass
Glass with a transparent metallic oxide coating applied onto or into a glass surface. The coating allows short-wave energy to pass through, but reflects long-wave infrared energy to improve the U-value.

Main Frame
The head, sill and jamb sections of a window.
Mechanically Fastened Frame
Refers to frames fastened with screws.
Meeting Rail
The horizontal sections of a pair of sash that meet when the sash are closed.
Meeting Stile
The vertical section of a pair of sash that meet when the sash are closed.
Mesh
Fabric of either fiberglass or aluminum that is used to make screens.
Mullion
A vertical or horizontal connecting unit between two or more windows.

Nailing Fin
An extrusion attached to the main frame of a window, which is used to secure the unit to the rough opening.

Oriel
A window with the meeting rail located off-center of the frame.

Patio Door
A glass door that slides open and closed on adjustable tandem rollers.

R-value
Resistance that a material has to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the greater the resistance.
Radiation
Wave energy transmitted directly from one object to another through the atmosphere or through transparent or translucent materials. The energy radiated is either transmitted, absorbed, reflected or a combination of all three.
Rail
The horizontal sections of the sash.
Relative Humidity Condensation Point
The relative humidity level at which visible water vapor or other liquid vapor begins to form on the surface of the sash or frame, based on an inside temperature of 70°F and an outside temperature of 0°F. The higher the percentage, the more moisture the air can hold before condensation will occur.

Sill
The horizontal, bottom section of the main frame.
Sill Extender
An extrusion that is attached to the bottom of the window to cover the gap between the sill and the rough opening.
Single Hung
A window in which one sash slides vertically and the other sash is fixed.
Single-strength Glass
Glass with a thickness of approximately 3/32″.
Slider Window
A window in which the sash moves horizontally. Sliders are available in a 2- or 3-lite configuration, with the 3-lite having operable end vents.
Sloped Sill
The sill of the window that has a downward slope to the outside. This sill has sufficient degree of slope to aid in water runoff.
Solar Heat Gain
The percentage of heat gained from both direct sunlight and absorbed heat. The smaller the number, the greater the ability to reduce solar heat gain.
Spacer
Material placed between two or more pieces of glass to maintain a uniform width between the glass, and to prevent sealant distortion.
Stile
The vertical sections of the sash.

Tape Glazing
Two-sided tape used to secure and seal the glass to the sash.
Tempered Glass
Glass with a surface compression of not less than 10,000 psi, or an edge compression of not less than 9,700 psi. When broken, the glass breaks into pebbles instead of shards.
Tilt Latch
The mechanism that unlocks the sash and allows it to tilt in from the main frame.

U-value
Amount of heat transferred through a material. The lower the U-value, the slower the rate of heat flow and the better the insulating quality.
UV Block
The percent of ultraviolet rays blocked from being transmitted through the glass. The higher the number, the lower the percentage of ultraviolet rays transmitted through the window.

Visible Light Transmittance
The percentage of light that is transmitted through glass in the visible light spectrum (380 to 720 nanometers). The higher the number, the higher the percentage of visible light transmitted through the window.

Weep Flaps
A weep hole that is covered with a flap that allows water to escape, while keeping insects out.
Weep Holes
Small openings designed to allow water to escape that might otherwise accumulate in a window’s sill.
Wet Glazing
A silicone-based substance used to secure and seal the glass to the sash.

 

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